Benador Associates Public Relations Benador Associates Public Relations Benador Associates Public Relations Benador Associates Public Relations
Benador Associates Public Relations Benador Associates Public Relations Benador Associates Public Relations Benador Associates Public Relations
Benador Associates Public Relations Benador Associates Public Relations

Public Relations

Benador Associates Public Relations Benador Associates Public Relations
Benador Associates Public Relations Benador Associates Public Relations
Benador Associates Public Relations Benador Associates Public Relations
Benador Associates Public Relations Benador Associates Public Relations
Benador Associates Public Relations Benador Associates Public Relations
Benador Associates Public Relations Benador Associates Public Relations

Benador Associates Public Relations Benador Associates Public Relations Benador Associates Public Relations

Benador Associates Public Relations

Govt will consider new Iraq probe

The Age
February 17, 2004

The federal government will consider a new inquiry into how Australia's spy agencies handled intelligence about Iraq's weapons of mass destruction if that's what a parliamentary committee recommends, Foreign Minister Alexander Downer said.

But Mr Downer refused to reveal anything that is in the committee's report on the issue that will be released on March 1.

He also said he doubted if any inquiry would find anything surprising or exciting.

Leaks about the committee's report say it will call for a second broader inquiry.

"If the parliamentary committee suggests a further inquiry, the government will consider it," Mr Downer told a news conference.

"I don't think any of these inquiries in America, Britain or here are going to reveal anything terribly exciting or surprising."

Mr Downer said he was scrupulous in his use of intelligence in the lead-up to the war.

His formal statements were drafted in his department and checked with the Office of National Assessments for accuracy.

"We (the government) made sure we didn't sex up the information we were given," he said.
advertisement
advertisement

Mr Downer said thousands of pieces of intelligence came in that said all sorts of different things.

"But in the end there are assessments done," he said.

"I have had another look at those assessments long since the war and these assessments slightly vary here or there, but I never saw an assessment saying Saddam Hussein had no WMD, that this whole thing is a great furphy, it was sexed up, George W Bush I hate him, stick pins in a model of him."

©2003 AAP

 

Email Benador Associates: eb@benadorassociates.com

Benador Associates Speakers Bureau
Benador Associates Speakers Bureau