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Public Relations

Benador Associates Public Relations Benador Associates Public Relations
Benador Associates Public Relations Benador Associates Public Relations
Benador Associates Public Relations Benador Associates Public Relations
Benador Associates Public Relations Benador Associates Public Relations
Benador Associates Public Relations Benador Associates Public Relations
Benador Associates Public Relations Benador Associates Public Relations

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Michael Meyer

Michael Meyer, a veteran correspondent and editor for Newsweek, has had a career that most foreign correspondents dream about. Almost uniquely among American journalists, he witnessed first-hand the dramatic events of 1989, a seminal year in 20th-century history. He was there the night the Berlin wall came down. He covered the fall of the Iron Curtain and the end of the Cold War, going from revolution to revolution throughout Eastern Europe: Warsaw, Prague, Budapest and Berlin. He was the last western journalist to interview the Romanian dictator, Nicolae Ceausescu, and was in Bucharest the day he was shot.

He went on to cover the collapse of the Soviet Union, from Moscow to the Baltics. Beginning in the early '90s, he traveled widely throughout the Balkans, writing of the coming war in Europe and chronicling the bloody disintegration of Yugoslavia. In 1999, he left the magazine for a diplomatic posting with the United Nations Mission in Kosovo, where he was a senior staff officer for the Organization of Security and Cooperation in Europe with principle responsibility for nation-building and civil society. He is the founding director of KosovaLive, a web-based news agency in Pristina.

Since 2001, Mr. Meyer has been Europe Editor for Newsweek International, where he also oversees the magazine's coverage of the Middle East and Central Asia. From 1993 through 1998, he was Newsweek's General editor for business and technology, covering the Internet revolution and receiving various prizes including the 1995 Computer Press Award. He was Newsweek's Los Angeles bureau chief from 1992 through 1993, the second-largest of Newsweek's bureaus, where he wrote and reported major stories from the politics of immigration to Hollywood's studio wars to the Los Angeles riots, for which he shared in a 1993 National Magazine Award for General Excellence. Between 1988 and 1992, Mr. Meyer was Newsweek's Bureau chief for Germany, Central Europe and the Balkans, writing more than 20 cover stories on the break-up of communist Europe and German unification. He is the winner of two Overseas Press Club Awards.

Mr. Meyer previously worked at the Washington Post and Congressional Quarterly. He began his career with brief stints as an international banker in Chicago and an oil industry consultant in Houston. He is the author of the "Alexander Complex" (Times Books, 1989), an examination of the psychology of American empire builders, and is completing a history of 1989 and the revolutions in Eastern Europe. Meyer is a member of the New York Council on Foreign Relations and was an Inaugural Fellow at the American Academy in Berlin. He holds graduate degrees from Columbia University and the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy. He is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations in New York.
DEALING WITH SERBIANewsweek InternationalNovember 6, 2006
SMALL CRISIS, BIG WAVESNew York PostOctober 9, 2006
ISLAM, THE POPE & THE OPERANew York PostOctober 2, 2006
IT'S TIME FOR A 'NIXON MOMENT'Gulf NewsAugust 25, 2006
A PERFECT STORMNewsweek InternatiohnalAug 9, 2006
ANATOMY OF AN ATTACKNewsweek InternationalJuly 29, 2006
LEBANON: U.N. TROOPS CAN'T HELPNew York PostJuly 21, 2006
THE LAST WORD: ELIE WIESELNewsweek InternatiohnalJuly 3-10, 2006 issue
Race for the MuddleNewsweek InternatiohnalJune 26, 2006
IRAN: THEN AND NOWGulf NewsJune 16, 2006
A PARABLE OF PETRO-POWERGulf NewsJune 7, 2006
UNCOMFORTABLE QUESTIONSNewsweekMay 20, 2006
LEARNING OUR LESSONS...Benador AssociatesMay 17, 2006

Email Benador Associates: eb@benadorassociates.com

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